Get our FREE Ignatius App.
Apple  Android 

August 27, 2015

St. Monica

Matthew 24: 42-51

Keep awake therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming. But understand this: if the owner of the house had known in what part of the night the thief was coming, he would have stayed awake and would not have let his house be broken into. Therefore you also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour. “Who then is the faithful and wise slave, whom his master has put in charge of his household, to give the other slaves their allowance of food at the proper time? Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives.

Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his possessions. But if that wicked slave says to himself, ‘My master is delayed,’ and he begins to beat his fellow slaves, and eats and drinks with drunkards, the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know. He will cut him in pieces and put him with the hypocrites, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

Freedom and Joy

Jesus challenges the disciples to “Stay Awake,” to be prepared. Through his book, Awareness, Jesuit author Anthony deMello challenges the reader to become aware – to wake up – from those assumptions, concepts, emotions and habits with which we unconsciously live. As we become more aware of these, that is as we become more conscious and intentional, we also grow in freedom to become more who we are meant to be.

Jesus’ describes the “faithful servant” as someone who fulfills who he or she is — persons with the freedom to live as we are meant to be. St. Ignatius establishes the Principle & Foundation as a key underpinning of the Spiritual Exercises. Both Jesus and Ignatius express this hope that, as we become more aware of who we are meant to bepeople who strive to reside in God’s lovewe become more fulfilled and we thrive in freedom and joy.

Fr. Glen Chun, S.J. is a campus ministry chaplain at Loyola University Chicago, IL, as well as the peripatetic minister of the Loyola University Jesuit community.

Prayer

The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God’s life to flow into us without limit.

All the things in this world are gifts of God, presented to us so that we can know God more easily and make a return of love more readily. As a result, we appreciate and use all these gifts of God insofar as they help us develop as loving persons.

But if any of these gifts become the center of our lives, they displace God and so hinder our growth toward our goal. In everyday life, then, we must hold ourselves in balance before all of these created gifts insofar as we have a choice and are not bound by some obligation. We should not fix our desires on health or sickness, wealth or poverty, success or failure, a long life or a short one.

For everything has the potential of calling forth in us a deeper response to our life in God. Our only desire and our one choice should be this: I want and I choose what better leads to God’s deepening his life in me.

— The Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Loyola (translate by  David Fleming, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to Pray.ignatius.org

Ignatian spirituality reminds us that God pursues us in the routines of our home and work life, and in the hopes and fears of life's challenges. The founder of the Jesuits, Saint Ignatius of Loyola, created the Spiritual Exercises to deepen our relationship with Christ and to move our contemplation into service. May this prayer site anchor your day and strengthen your resolve to remember what truly matters.

(more about this site)


Visit our Social Media


Submit a Prayer Request

Oops! We could not locate your form.

Archive

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
    123
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930 
       
    123
25262728   
       
   1234
262728    
       
       
       
    123
45678910
       
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031   
       
      1
       
     12
       
     12
3456789
10111213141516
       

August 27, 2015

St. Monica

Matthew 24: 42-51

Keep awake therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming. But understand this: if the owner of the house had known in what part of the night the thief was coming, he would have stayed awake and would not have let his house be broken into. Therefore you also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour. “Who then is the faithful and wise slave, whom his master has put in charge of his household, to give the other slaves their allowance of food at the proper time? Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives.

Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his possessions. But if that wicked slave says to himself, ‘My master is delayed,’ and he begins to beat his fellow slaves, and eats and drinks with drunkards, the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know. He will cut him in pieces and put him with the hypocrites, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

Freedom and Joy

Jesus challenges the disciples to “Stay Awake,” to be prepared. Through his book, Awareness, Jesuit author Anthony deMello challenges the reader to become aware – to wake up – from those assumptions, concepts, emotions and habits with which we unconsciously live. As we become more aware of these, that is as we become more conscious and intentional, we also grow in freedom to become more who we are meant to be.

Jesus’ describes the “faithful servant” as someone who fulfills who he or she is — persons with the freedom to live as we are meant to be. St. Ignatius establishes the Principle & Foundation as a key underpinning of the Spiritual Exercises. Both Jesus and Ignatius express this hope that, as we become more aware of who we are meant to bepeople who strive to reside in God’s lovewe become more fulfilled and we thrive in freedom and joy.

Fr. Glen Chun, S.J. is a campus ministry chaplain at Loyola University Chicago, IL, as well as the peripatetic minister of the Loyola University Jesuit community.

Prayer

The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God’s life to flow into us without limit.

All the things in this world are gifts of God, presented to us so that we can know God more easily and make a return of love more readily. As a result, we appreciate and use all these gifts of God insofar as they help us develop as loving persons.

But if any of these gifts become the center of our lives, they displace God and so hinder our growth toward our goal. In everyday life, then, we must hold ourselves in balance before all of these created gifts insofar as we have a choice and are not bound by some obligation. We should not fix our desires on health or sickness, wealth or poverty, success or failure, a long life or a short one.

For everything has the potential of calling forth in us a deeper response to our life in God. Our only desire and our one choice should be this: I want and I choose what better leads to God’s deepening his life in me.

— The Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Loyola (translate by  David Fleming, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!