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September 10, 2015

Col 3: 12-17

As God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, meekness, and patience. Bear with one another and, if anyone has a complaint against another, forgive each other; just as the Lord has forgiven you, so you also must forgive. Above all, clothe yourselves with love, which binds everything together in perfect harmony. And let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called in the one body. And be thankful.

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly; teach and admonish one another in all wisdom; and with gratitude in your hearts sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs to God. And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

With All My Heart

A contradiction with Ignatian discernment is that “indifference” is far different from its more common usage: I am indifferent = I don’t care.  In the Ignatian sense, to be indifferent is to care whole-heartedly towards something, with full desire and hope; but with equally full openness and freedom towards whatever the outcome. In other words, it would be with full hope but no expectation.

Today’s first reading is tempting to gloss over as “well, that’s really nice and pretty” but out of reach to normal human persons. Easier said than done!  A way to pray with this is to receive God’s indifference:  that God hopes all of these things for us, but has no expectation of the results.

Still, we must strive will all our heart, with all our mind and all our strength to accomplish these in our lives. Can I trust that these are enough for our God of heartfelt compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, and patience?

—Fr. Glen Chun, S.J. serves as the genial minister of the Loyola University Jesuit community, Chicago IL.

Prayer

Creation is a gift;  it is a wonderful gift that God has given us, so that we care for it and we use it for the benefit of all, always with great respect and gratitude.”

—Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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Ignatian spirituality reminds us that God pursues us in the routines of our home and work life, and in the hopes and fears of life's challenges. The founder of the Jesuits, Saint Ignatius of Loyola, created the Spiritual Exercises to deepen our relationship with Christ and to move our contemplation into service. May this prayer site anchor your day and strengthen your resolve to remember what truly matters.

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September 10, 2015

Col 3: 12-17

As God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, meekness, and patience. Bear with one another and, if anyone has a complaint against another, forgive each other; just as the Lord has forgiven you, so you also must forgive. Above all, clothe yourselves with love, which binds everything together in perfect harmony. And let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called in the one body. And be thankful.

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly; teach and admonish one another in all wisdom; and with gratitude in your hearts sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs to God. And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

With All My Heart

A contradiction with Ignatian discernment is that “indifference” is far different from its more common usage: I am indifferent = I don’t care.  In the Ignatian sense, to be indifferent is to care whole-heartedly towards something, with full desire and hope; but with equally full openness and freedom towards whatever the outcome. In other words, it would be with full hope but no expectation.

Today’s first reading is tempting to gloss over as “well, that’s really nice and pretty” but out of reach to normal human persons. Easier said than done!  A way to pray with this is to receive God’s indifference:  that God hopes all of these things for us, but has no expectation of the results.

Still, we must strive will all our heart, with all our mind and all our strength to accomplish these in our lives. Can I trust that these are enough for our God of heartfelt compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, and patience?

—Fr. Glen Chun, S.J. serves as the genial minister of the Loyola University Jesuit community, Chicago IL.

Prayer

Creation is a gift;  it is a wonderful gift that God has given us, so that we care for it and we use it for the benefit of all, always with great respect and gratitude.”

—Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!