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March 3, 2018

Micah 7:14-15, 18-20

Shepherd your people with your staff, the flock that belongs to you, which lives alone in a forest in the midst of a garden land; let them feed in Bashan and Gilead as in the days of old. As in the days when you came out of the land of Egypt, show us marvelous things. Who is a God like you, pardoning iniquity and passing over the transgression of the remnant of your possession?

He does not retain his anger forever, because he delights in showing clemency. He will again have compassion upon us; he will tread our iniquities under foot. You will cast all our sins into the depths of the sea. You will show faithfulness to Jacob and unswerving loyalty to Abraham, as you have sworn to our ancestors from the days of old.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Wholly forgiven

Today’s first reading again reminds me of how different I am from God.  God not only offers forgiveness, but “delights in showing clemency.”  On my best days, I’m able to let go of a hurt or anger and forgive someone who has hurt me.  On my worst days, I can hold an impressive grudge.  Perhaps because it can be so hard for us to offer forgiveness, it can be difficult for many of us to accept that we are, truly and completely, forgiven by God.  

The imagery used by the prophet Micah offers us a powerful visual.  I picture God standing along the seashore with a big rock of sins, throwing it as far as possible into the ocean.  In the First Week of St. Ignatius’ Spiritual Exercises, we are invited to recognize ourselves as sinners, but sinners who are wholly loved by God.  We are not loved after we are forgiven, we are forgiven because we are loved.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

Prayer

In the First Week of the Spiritual Exercises, we ask forgiveness of our sins and are invited to prayerfully reflect on three questions. As we pray today, I invite you to consider:

  • What have I done for Christ?

  • What am I doing for Christ?

  • What ought I to do for Christ?

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to Pray.ignatius.org

Ignatian spirituality reminds us that God pursues us in the routines of our home and work life, and in the hopes and fears of life's challenges. The founder of the Jesuits, Saint Ignatius of Loyola, created the Spiritual Exercises to deepen our relationship with Christ and to move our contemplation into service. May this prayer site anchor your day and strengthen your resolve to remember what truly matters.

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March 3, 2018

Micah 7:14-15, 18-20

Shepherd your people with your staff, the flock that belongs to you, which lives alone in a forest in the midst of a garden land; let them feed in Bashan and Gilead as in the days of old. As in the days when you came out of the land of Egypt, show us marvelous things. Who is a God like you, pardoning iniquity and passing over the transgression of the remnant of your possession?

He does not retain his anger forever, because he delights in showing clemency. He will again have compassion upon us; he will tread our iniquities under foot. You will cast all our sins into the depths of the sea. You will show faithfulness to Jacob and unswerving loyalty to Abraham, as you have sworn to our ancestors from the days of old.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Wholly forgiven

Today’s first reading again reminds me of how different I am from God.  God not only offers forgiveness, but “delights in showing clemency.”  On my best days, I’m able to let go of a hurt or anger and forgive someone who has hurt me.  On my worst days, I can hold an impressive grudge.  Perhaps because it can be so hard for us to offer forgiveness, it can be difficult for many of us to accept that we are, truly and completely, forgiven by God.  

The imagery used by the prophet Micah offers us a powerful visual.  I picture God standing along the seashore with a big rock of sins, throwing it as far as possible into the ocean.  In the First Week of St. Ignatius’ Spiritual Exercises, we are invited to recognize ourselves as sinners, but sinners who are wholly loved by God.  We are not loved after we are forgiven, we are forgiven because we are loved.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

Prayer

In the First Week of the Spiritual Exercises, we ask forgiveness of our sins and are invited to prayerfully reflect on three questions. As we pray today, I invite you to consider:

  • What have I done for Christ?

  • What am I doing for Christ?

  • What ought I to do for Christ?

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!