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June 21, 2019

St. Aloysius Gonzaga, SJ

Mt 6: 19-23

“Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust consume and where thieves break in and steal; but store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust consumes and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.

“The eye is the lamp of the body. So, if your eye is healthy, your whole body will be full of light; but if your eye is unhealthy, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light in you is darkness, how great is the darkness!

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Concerning Treasures

The text of this Gospel fascinates me. The images are stark (“the eye is the lamp of the body”). The rhythm of the passage is gently musical; each sentence is a tidy parallelism. The effect is soothing, almost like a chant.

But the imperatives of each parallel! Am I up for this challenge?

Less eloquently put—stop accumulating stuff; start cultivating yourself for eternal life.

These two passages in tandem are a chance to question how my vision may be clouded by the things I surround myself with, to consider whether my consumption brings me closer to or further from God.

—Claire Peterson works in the advancement and communications office of the USA Central and Southern Province and is the local organizer for Jesuit Connections – St. Louis.

Prayer

A Consumer’s Examen

What did I purchase this week?
What motivated these buys? A need? An impulse to surround myself with comfortable goods?

Did they make me more capable of being available to others and to God?
How can I consume more effectively with God tomorrow?
May I remember the simple need for daily bread.

—Claire Peterson


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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June 21, 2019

St. Aloysius Gonzaga, SJ

Mt 6: 19-23

“Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust consume and where thieves break in and steal; but store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust consumes and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.

“The eye is the lamp of the body. So, if your eye is healthy, your whole body will be full of light; but if your eye is unhealthy, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light in you is darkness, how great is the darkness!

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Concerning Treasures

The text of this Gospel fascinates me. The images are stark (“the eye is the lamp of the body”). The rhythm of the passage is gently musical; each sentence is a tidy parallelism. The effect is soothing, almost like a chant.

But the imperatives of each parallel! Am I up for this challenge?

Less eloquently put—stop accumulating stuff; start cultivating yourself for eternal life.

These two passages in tandem are a chance to question how my vision may be clouded by the things I surround myself with, to consider whether my consumption brings me closer to or further from God.

—Claire Peterson works in the advancement and communications office of the USA Central and Southern Province and is the local organizer for Jesuit Connections – St. Louis.

Prayer

A Consumer’s Examen

What did I purchase this week?
What motivated these buys? A need? An impulse to surround myself with comfortable goods?

Did they make me more capable of being available to others and to God?
How can I consume more effectively with God tomorrow?
May I remember the simple need for daily bread.

—Claire Peterson


Please share the Good Word with your friends!