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February 7, 2020

Sir 47: 2-11

As the fat is set apart from the offering of well-being,

   so David was set apart from the Israelites.

He played with lions as though they were young goats,

   and with bears as though they were lambs of the flock.

In his youth did he not kill a giant,

   and take away the people’s disgrace,

when he whirled the stone in the sling

   and struck down the boasting Goliath?

For he called on the Lord, the Most High,

   and he gave strength to his right arm

to strike down a mighty warrior,

   and to exalt the power of his people.

So they glorified him for the tens of thousands he conquered,

   and praised him for the blessings bestowed by the Lord,

   when the glorious diadem was given to him.

For he wiped out his enemies on every side,

   and annihilated his adversaries the Philistines;

   he crushed their power to our own day.

In all that he did he gave thanks

   to the Holy One, the Most High, proclaiming his glory;

he sang praise with all his heart,

   and he loved his Maker.

He placed singers before the altar,

   to make sweet melody with their voices.

He gave beauty to the festivals,

   and arranged their times throughout the year,

while they praised God’s holy name,

   and the sanctuary resounded from early morning.

The Lord took away his sins,

   and exalted his power for ever;

he gave him a covenant of kingship

   and a glorious throne in Israel.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Flawed humans called to glorify God

Today we hear about the great acts of David in our Old Testament reading from Sirach.  There is of course the slaying of the giant, but also his successes on the battlefield, in all of which he gives glory to God and gives credit to God as the source of his success.  But let us not forget that this David was a flawed individual. The deeply sinful parts of his life are summed up in one short sentence: “The Lord forgave him his sins.” And he was totally rehabilitated: “The Lord exalted his strength forever.”

Fr. James Martin, SJ, has written that saints are both patrons and companions; flawed men and women who intercede for us, and through whom God accomplishes extraordinary things.  A priest mentor of mine once called us as “angels with broken wings.” Whether our acts are to be great or simple today, we too are to first find the source of our strength and direction in God and to give glory to God by what we say and do. 

—Jim Bozik is a permanent deacon at St. Peter Catholic Church in Charlotte, NC, the Jesuit parish in the Diocese of Charlotte.

Prayer

Christ has no body now but yours.
No hands, no feet on earth but yours.
Yours are the eyes through which he looks compassion on this world.
Yours are the feet with which he walks to do good.
Yours are the hands through which he blesses all the world.
Yours are the hands, yours are the feet, yours are the eyes, you are his body.
Christ has no body now on earth but yours.”

—St. Teresa of Avila


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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February 7, 2020

Sir 47: 2-11

As the fat is set apart from the offering of well-being,

   so David was set apart from the Israelites.

He played with lions as though they were young goats,

   and with bears as though they were lambs of the flock.

In his youth did he not kill a giant,

   and take away the people’s disgrace,

when he whirled the stone in the sling

   and struck down the boasting Goliath?

For he called on the Lord, the Most High,

   and he gave strength to his right arm

to strike down a mighty warrior,

   and to exalt the power of his people.

So they glorified him for the tens of thousands he conquered,

   and praised him for the blessings bestowed by the Lord,

   when the glorious diadem was given to him.

For he wiped out his enemies on every side,

   and annihilated his adversaries the Philistines;

   he crushed their power to our own day.

In all that he did he gave thanks

   to the Holy One, the Most High, proclaiming his glory;

he sang praise with all his heart,

   and he loved his Maker.

He placed singers before the altar,

   to make sweet melody with their voices.

He gave beauty to the festivals,

   and arranged their times throughout the year,

while they praised God’s holy name,

   and the sanctuary resounded from early morning.

The Lord took away his sins,

   and exalted his power for ever;

he gave him a covenant of kingship

   and a glorious throne in Israel.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Flawed humans called to glorify God

Today we hear about the great acts of David in our Old Testament reading from Sirach.  There is of course the slaying of the giant, but also his successes on the battlefield, in all of which he gives glory to God and gives credit to God as the source of his success.  But let us not forget that this David was a flawed individual. The deeply sinful parts of his life are summed up in one short sentence: “The Lord forgave him his sins.” And he was totally rehabilitated: “The Lord exalted his strength forever.”

Fr. James Martin, SJ, has written that saints are both patrons and companions; flawed men and women who intercede for us, and through whom God accomplishes extraordinary things.  A priest mentor of mine once called us as “angels with broken wings.” Whether our acts are to be great or simple today, we too are to first find the source of our strength and direction in God and to give glory to God by what we say and do. 

—Jim Bozik is a permanent deacon at St. Peter Catholic Church in Charlotte, NC, the Jesuit parish in the Diocese of Charlotte.

Prayer

Christ has no body now but yours.
No hands, no feet on earth but yours.
Yours are the eyes through which he looks compassion on this world.
Yours are the feet with which he walks to do good.
Yours are the hands through which he blesses all the world.
Yours are the hands, yours are the feet, yours are the eyes, you are his body.
Christ has no body now on earth but yours.”

—St. Teresa of Avila


Please share the Good Word with your friends!